Friday, March 22, 2013

'tis the season for paska...

We began the season a little early over here this year...
 with the grands.


They came for a sleepover...
and thought paska for breakfast was a fine idea.
And it was!


There are those who heard it was paska season...
but had no idea how to bake paska.

And so they came to our paska cooking class at Lepp Farm Market last night.
They'll be baking paska before Easter...
guaranteed.


Maybe even tomorrow!


Marg demo'd Ellen's paska spread for us last night...
since Ellen couldn't make the long trek north from Seattle this time.
She did a fine job, Ellen!

And since paska is part of our Easter fare...
we cooked up a traditional Easter meal for the class last night.
We had baked ham with mustard sauce...
scalloped potatoes...
coleslaw...
and pluma moos (cold fruit soup).

And paska...of course.
Just in case you feel like adding paska to your Easter menu this year...
I'll leave you the link to the recipe we used last night.
That would be...
Lovella's famous paska recipe.
Try it.
I think you'll like it!

Have a great weekend...


 


16 comments:

  1. Too bad I live so far away...I would love to come to one of your cooking classes. I know it would be fun. I've never had patka, but it looks yummy!

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  2. Another successful class at Lepps! I think it's so wonderful that you ladies do this! I hope you do a video sometime so we on the East side of the country can join in too! I will be making mine this weekend and I need to check into Ellen's spread recipe too. BTW - love your little jelly bean hugging bunnies on your paskas - so adorable! Have a wonderful weekend.

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  3. Noooooo - I'm over on this side and it's the first time I haven't checked the Lepp's website to see what's offered. I'm sure it was a great class and that everyone enjoyed it thoroughly. In truth, I was probably in my pj's by the time the class started, as the days have been long and intense. I am so glad that I learned to make Paska from MMGCC and will surely make it when I get home. I love that this tradition has become ours too - and it must be so for many others. The power of the blogging connection - the gift of it!

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  4. Marg's Seerney Paska looks perfect and I'm sure it was enjoyed. Love seeing all this freshly baked Paska. I'm really hungry down here with the snow falling...
    Have a great weekend!

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  5. So pretty! I think this year I do want to try Ellen's recipe too.
    Now I would like an Official Paska rule: I have read Paska is strictly a pre- and on Easter food item in the Mennonite tradition.The pre aspect seems a bit odd, making such delicable fare during Lent for Lent celebrators and curious choice for Good Friday fare.
    It would make more sense to me to have Paska be an Easter through to Ascenion or perhaps Pentecost food item to celebrate Christ's time of resurrection and earthly presence.

    Any guesses/comments as to why the Mennonite tradition cuts off Paska eating after Easter?

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    Replies
    1. I'm with you Jill...that's how it was in our house and this is the first year that I have broken the rule only because we are heading to the states and I need to sneak my Paska over the border...so it's being baked today, and will be served next weekend. After getting to know Lovella, it sounds like Paska can be made year round. I'm quite religious about making only one batch and keeping it to Easter only.

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  6. I think the rules are changing as time moves on, Jill...or there really are no rules. When I grew up, paska was baked immediately before Easter and consumed during the Easter celebrations. Whatever was left, got toasted in the next day or two. There was definitely no eating of paska during the days and weeks preceding Easter back in Ukraine...where the practice originated. You prompted me to do some research and I found out that...'on Good Friday afternoon, in the solemn hours of remembering Christ's death on the cross, Ukrainian women began their yearly ritual of Paska baking.' I'm thinking Lovella began the tradition of baking, eating & enjoying paska from Valentine's Day until Easter. :)

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  7. Oh my, that looks and sounds sooo good. If I weren't so far away I'd sign up for that class in a minute.
    It's easy to see why your grands requested paska for the sleepover. I've been intrigued by it ever since I first read about it on your blog. One of these days I must try it for myself. Thanks for providing the recipe.

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  8. Paska is in the air, it's the only thing that reminds us that Easter is coming, not like the snow that is dampening so many activities.
    That was a fun evening working together. Thanks for all your tips and organization.
    Tennis when the sun shines???

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  9. If I get it together this is exactly what I'll be doing this weekend. I want to try the paska rolls...must investigate that further. Such beautiful pictures, Judy!

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  10. It is very early Saturday morning, and I am here at my computer with a tall mug of hot coffee. Can you imagine what it did to me as I saw the first Paska picture you shared? I don't have a single doubt that I would so enjoy this recipe. I visited the site where Lovella shares her recipe, read the recipe, and then more than ever wished that I could have been in the class. I do think I need a class before I tackle paska. You sure make it look so good! What a privlege your grandchildren have. Great pictures!

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  11. Yummy paska! I hope to do make some this week!

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  12. This makes me wish I lived much closer - I certainly would have enjoyed the opportunity to learn how to make paska with you all. Though I guess I could figure it out on my own with your recipe. They sure are pretty all decorated. I know my sister has made them from your recipe and she says they are very delicious.

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  13. We always had Paska at Easter as my maternal grandmother was from the Ukraine. In the past few years I've also made an Italian style Easter braided bread that is decorated with dyed hard boiled eggs. This year I will have to limit my bread offerings as two family members are gluten sensitive. I have to make items which everyone can enjoy --still searching for Easter holiday recipes that are gluten free.

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    Replies
    1. Julie has perfected a gluten free version of paska. The recipe is posted on the MGCC recipe blog if you are ever interested in trying it.

      http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2012/03/paska-gluten-free-improved-recipe.html

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